Student Visas

Health and Care

August 1, 2012 in Business Class, Immigration Services, Student Visas by CanimmigrateCanada  |  Comments Off

Health care in Canada

All Canadian citizens and permanent residents are eligible for health insurance in Canada.

Canada’s health insurance system is set up to respond to people’s need for health care rather than their ability to pay for it. Often referred to as medicare, the system is designed to make sure that all residents of Canada have reasonable access to health care from doctors and hospitals.

Instead of having a single national plan, Canada’s health care program is made up of provincial and territorial health insurance plans, all of which share certain common features and standards. Canada’s public health care system is funded through taxes and administered by the provinces and territories.

Public health insurance

All Canadians and permanent residents may apply for health insurance. When you have health insurance you do not have to pay directly for most health-care services. They are paid for through your taxes. When you use health-care services, you simply show your health insurance card to the hospital or medical clinic.

Health insurance is different in each province and territory. The medical care your province or territory offers might not be covered in other provinces and territories. When you travel, check your coverage; you may require private health insurance.

Apply for public health insurance as soon as possible

You should apply for a health insurance card from your provincial or territorial government as soon as possible after you arrive in Canada.

You can get an application form at a doctor’s office, a hospital, a pharmacy or an immigrant-serving organization. You can also get forms online from your province or territory’s ministry responsible for health.

Required documents

When you apply for your health insurance card you will need to show some identification, such as your birth certificate or passport, or your Confirmation of Permanent Residence (IMM 5292). You can also show your Permanent Resident Card.

What you will receive

In most provinces and territories, each family member receives their own card with a personal health identification number. In Manitoba, only adults receive health insurance cards. The adult card lists each family member’s name and personal identification number.

Your health insurance card shows your name, address, gender and birth date. You must carry the card with you and present it at a hospital or clinic when you or someone in your family needs health services.

Waiting for health insurance coverage to begin

Depending on which province or territory you decide to make your new home, you may have to wait a period of time before you are eligible for public health insurance. During this time, you should apply for temporary private health insurance coverage.

Private insurance companies are listed in the yellow pages of the telephone book, usually under Insurance. You must buy this private insurance within five days of arriving in your province or territory or insurance companies may not provide coverage for you.

Refugee claimants who cannot afford private health insurance and refugee claimants living in provinces that have a three-month waiting period can receive emergency and essential health services at no cost. The cost for these services is covered by the Interim Federal Health Program.

Private health insurance

Private health insurance is available for services that may not be covered under your province or territory’s health insurance plan. These might include dental costs, private hospital rooms, the cost of prescription drugs, dental care, ambulance services and prescription eyeglasses. Some employers offer you the option to pay for extra health insurance from your pay cheque.

Do not lose or share your card

You must not share your health insurance card with anyone else. Your card is for your use only and you could lose the benefits it provides by letting other people use it. You could also face criminal charges and be removed from Canada. If you lose the card, you might have to pay a fee to replace it.

Finding more information

Health information is available from provincial and territorial ministries of health.

  • British Columbia
  • Alberta
  • Saskatchewan
  • Manitoba
  • Ontario
  • Quebec
  • New Brunswick
  • Nova Scotia
  • Prince Edward Island
  • Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Yukon
  • Northwest Territories
  • Nunavut

Visit the Health Care System website for more information on health insurance coverage and cards in each province and territory.

 

Quebec Immigration

October 18, 2011 in Business Class, Immigration Services, Student Visas by CanimmigrateCanada  |  Comments Off

Quebec Immigration
The province of Quebec offers the same immigration programs as the Federal government, and it is currently actively recruiting new immigrants to fill their specific needs. An important requirement for persons willing to move to Quebec is knowledge of French and an ability to easily integrate into the province’s distinct society. Quebec would be most appealing to people of Southern European descent and to Latin Americans.
Caregiver Program
Individuals willing to provide live-in help to care for children, the infirm or the elderly in the home may benefit form the live-in caregiver program. In order to qualify the person must:
• Have a Canadian employer
• Completed the educational equivalent of grade 12
• Have the ability to communicate in either English or French
• Have taken a 6-month course in an area related to the work intended or have one-year relevant work experience
Once in Canada, caregivers must work live-in for two years. They will then be permitted to apply for their Permanent Residence
It is important to note that the Canadian government has taken steps to guarantee that workers in this area are treated fairly and in accordance with the labour laws of the provinces.

Pre-removal Risk Assessments
Any person who is being removed from Canada has a right to a Pre-Removal Risk Assessment. This is the last evaluation done in order to determine whether or not the person would be at risk if deported from Canada.
Detention Reviews
A person who is detained for immigration violations has a right to a detention review. If the person does not pose a danger to the public and/or to himself; there is no concern that the person would hide from the immigration authorities if released and the person is able to provide proper identification, the person could be released from detention. In most cases the person would require a guarantor.
Immigration Appeals
The appeal division has jurisdiction over specific cases: Refused sponsorships, permanent residents ordered deported, permanent residents who lose their residency because they were out of Canada for more than the time allowed by law and others.

Rehabilitation
Persons who have a criminal record in their country of origin or anywhere in the world are inadmissible to Canada unless they obtain rehabilitation. The rules to obtain rehabilitation vary. Criminal inadmissibility may be overcome by obtaining this document.
Pardons
A person who is not a citizen and was convicted of a crime in Canada will become inadmissible to Canada on criminal grounds. This inadmissibility may be overcome by obtaining a pardon.
Humanitarian & Compassionate Cases
For people who do not fit within any of the programs for immigration to Canada, but find themselves in exceptional circumstances, there is the option of making a request on Humanitarian and Compassionate grounds. An immigration officer may find there are special circumstances that merit a person remain in Canada as a Permanent Resident.
These are brief explanations of programs to show there are a variety of ways to obtain immigration status in Canada.
Please contact us for detail consultation to decide which category you can fit in for your immigration application to Canada.

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Canadian Refugees

October 9, 2011 in Business Class, Immigration Services, Student Visas by CanimmigrateCanada  |  Comments Off

Are you a Refugee or a Person in Need of Protection?

A person may be considered a Convention refugee if they have a well-founded fear of persecution upon return to their country of origin or country of last residence. There are five grounds of persecution, recognized by the international community: race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group and political opinion, or if the person may be subjected to cruel and unusual punishment or risk to life. When someone claims refugee status, there must be a relation between the fear of persecution and one of the five grounds. They usually must show that their country cannot offer protection in any capacity.

A particular social group is the ground most open to interpretation and it has included domestic abuse and sexual orientation, for example, but does not include economic persecution or medical grounds.

Bill C-11 – Balanced Refugee Reform Act.

Upcoming changes to the asylum system will come into effect in late 2011 and are intended to improve efficiency in delivering faster decisions, deterring abuse, resettling more refugees, making it easier for them to start their lines in Canada and quickly removing failed refugee claimants.

Changes to the system include:

–        An initial information gathering interview at the IRB

–        A first level hearing staffed by public servant decision makers at the IRB

–        A new Refugee Appeal Division at the IRB

–        A bar on accessing pre-removal risk assessments and temporary resident permits for one year following a final negative IRB decision

–        An Assisted Voluntary Returns pilot program

–        Authority to designate countries of origin

–        Authority to identify claims as manifestly unfounded at the first level hearing

–        Faster processing times

–        Faster removal of failed refugee claimants

The new system is designed to make decisions within 60-90 days. Most failed claimants will be removed within 12 months of the final decision from the Immigration and Refugee Board.

Current System

New System

Eligibility review 

 

Eligibility review – no change 

3 days

Information gathered in 28 days through a paper-based Personal Information Form Information gathered 15 days after referral of claim through an in-person interview at the IRB
No authority to designate countries of origin Authority to designate countries of origin 

(Countries that do not normally produce refugees, that have a robust human rights record and offer strong state protection.) Expedited appeals for claimants from these countries who receive negative decisions.

Initial hearing currently in about 19 months by Governor in Council term appointees Initial hearing and decision within 60 to 90 days by permanent public servant members at the IRB
No Appeal Division at the IRB A new Refugee Appeal Division at the IRB, with a decision within 30 to 120 days of filing and perfecting an appeal
Access to Federal Court 

 

Access to the Federal Court 

4 months

Access to Pre-Removal Risk Assessment (PRRA) If not removed within 1 year – access to a PRRA  and Temporary Resident Permit (TRP)
Removal; no Assisted Voluntary Returns Removal within 1 year after final negative IRB decision; new Assisted Voluntary Returns program (increased education and counseling for failed asylum claimants. The program will also provide limited financial assistance to a third party which will use the funds to help a person return to their home country.)

Related Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ’s):

How Long Does It Take to Be Assessed as a Refugee?

Q.I have a good friend who is in the USA illegally and intends to come to Canada and claim protected person status. I understand the procedure takes a long time and the applicants have to wait long time until their fate is decided. Is this true?

The projection for 2008 is that approximately 38,000 people will claim refugee/protected person status in Canada. In an effort to streamline the process, Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) together with the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) introduced a new integrated form that gathers information in one document. In an effort to fast track the procedure, the officers at the refugee intake process will assess the admissibility and eligibility of each person claiming refugee status in Canada, and not assess whether the claim is well-founded, as this assessment will be performed by the Refugee Protection Division as part of the refugee determination process. Your friend however may be subject to the Safe Third Country Agreement where persons entering Canada from the USA and claiming protection are ineligible in certain circumstances to claim. The backlog for refugee cases is growing and cases are taking a year to two to schedule depending upon the region in Canada and the country from which the claimant is fleeing. Please consult a lawyer before making the claim.

Last, this is my final article for 2008. I am amazed and flattered with the hundreds of questions I receive each week and the many kind words that have been expressed. I am delighted the column is helping so many people. Keep asking and I will keep answering! I, on behalf of myself and 24 Hours, wish everyone peace, health and prosperity over the holiday season and in 2009.

Can I file in Buffalo?

Q. I am an avid reader your immigration section in the 24 Hours. I am in a difficult situation here in Canada and do not know what to do to gain status in Canada. I came to Canada a few years ago, I claimed refugee status and my application has been refused.
I am now without status and on the verge of being sent back home and I am rather desperate. I went to a consultant and asked whether I can file a skilled worker application in Buffalo and he said that of course I can. Other people though tell me that I cannot file in Buffalo and I am not sure what should I do? Pay the consultant to file in Buffalo or take some other people’s advice and file in my home country?

A. Of course, this is a question asked by many people who are in Canada and do not know the difference. But I am amazed by the response given to you assuring you that you may file your case in Buffalo. The legislation is very clear on this point. You came to Canada and claimed refugee status, you were not admitted to Canada legally for at least one year, therefore your application cannot be filed in Buffalo visa office. Only those people who came to Canada with a valid visa for at least one year can file to that visa office. All the others have to file in the countries of their citizenship or where they reside legally. Depending on each individual case and circumstances, there are other ways to file a legal application in Canada, one of them being the application based on humanitarian and compassionate grounds. Thank you for your question.

Q. What are the reasons one can claim refugee protection for?

A. A Convention refugee means that the claimant has a well-founded fear of persecution. There are five grounds of persecution, recognized by the international community: race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group and political opinion. When someone claims refugee status, there must be a relation between the fear of persecution and one of the five grounds as enumerated above.
When claiming refugee status, one can identify the grounds or not. It will be up to the Refugee Division of the IRB (Immigration and Refugee Board) to determine whether the grounds referred to is genuine or not or whether there are other grounds of persecution.
The claimants are required to fill out the Personal Information Form (PIF) where they have to give all the details about their background, their family’s background in terms of education, work history, addresses, etc. and, most of all, the ground for their claim with details. The claimants must bring forward all the documentary support to prove their case, otherwise their story cannot be corroborated with the claim.
In Canada, the refugee claimants are allowed to work and earn their own living, until their case is heard by the Refugee Division. Once your case is approved, you are allowed to apply for permanent resident status, including all the members of your family.
Refugee claimants do not have to meet the medical requirements, meaning, they can be approved, even though they are medically inadmissible, which is a huge advantage for the applicants.
Or, if your case is refused, you will have to prepare yourself for departure, after going through all the other steps that might allow you to remain in Canada.

Q. I have a friend from Somalia who lives now in the United States. He would like to come to Canada and apply for refugee status at the border. Can this be done and what are his chances?

A. Canada’s legislation regarding refugees takes into consideration its international obligations as signatory to: the 1951 United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and the 1967 Protocol; and the Convention against Torture (Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment);
Canada has developed a front-end procedure for all refugee claimants, at each land border and in the airports. This procedure is mandatory for each claimant, meaning an in-person interview/claim, security and criminal background checks. To make a claim, the applicant must submit in person, in writing and in front of an officer. The refugee claimant has the burden of proof, meaning that he/she must show that the claim is eligible for refugee protection. A claim is ineligible if the person:
has already been granted refugee protection in Canada or in another country; has previously been refused refugee protection in Canada; came to Canada from, or through, a designated safe third country where you could have claimed refugee protection, or is a security risk, have violated human or international rights, have committed a serious crime or have been involved in organized crime. In your friend’s case, we do not know whether he claimed refugee status there or not. USA is considered a safe third country and as per the USA-Canada safe third country agreement, he must have claimed refugee in the USA first, before coming to Canada. As we are not clear about his status, he might or might not be allowed to claim refugee in Canada. In the next edition, I will expand a little bit on the reasons for refugee protection.

Refugee Reform

Q. I understand the government has changed the law.  I am seeking refugee status and have put in a humanitarian case too.  Now I cannot have both? I am being told I should make other applications right away.  What should I do? Your advice would really help.

A.  We have begun receiving questions after the Government’s announcement last week. First it is important to highlight these are proposed changes and not law at this time.  Second, on a review of the proposed changes (Bill C-11), there does not appear to be mention of making changes retroactively, meaning to those persons who have already claimed protected person status and filed a humanitarian and compassionate (H&C) grounds application.  If the Bill became law as it currently reads yes there would a restriction on seeking protected person status and H&C relief at the same time but for those that already filed and/or claimed.  This restriction will be a very hotly contested issue and it is not clear if it will become law.  Other potential changes include a list of certain countries that are deemed to be safe, a screening by a tribunal officer from the RPD at first instance, the introduction of a Refugee Appeal Division (RAD), a processing target of setting hearings down within sixty days, and limited access to H&C applications and pre removal risk assessments (PRRA) for certain classes of claimants, to list but a few.  There is bound to be much information circulated about these potential amendments but until they are law be careful not be to be mislead by those who may see this as an opportunity to exploit people

Canadian Refugee Law

Do I need to Appeal to IAD or Waive my Right of Appeal?

Q. I have landed in Canada with my family as permanent residents in May 1996, but I had to go back to India with my family in August 1996. In August 2002, I intended to return to Canada and wrote to the Canadian High Commission in India to clarify my status and issue me an Authorization to return. Since I had not received any response and telephonic discussion was not being entertained, I made a new application in December 2002, just for not losing my PR status. Now I received a response to my application for PR made in Dec. 2002 saying that we are still permanent residents who did not comply with the residency obligation and must sign a Consent to Decision of Residence and Waiver of Appeal Rights, to continue my application. Signing this document removes the PR status also waives the right of appeal of the removal of this status. They continue to say that if we believe we are still PRs, then we must apply for a Permanent Resident Travel Document. They gave us 30 days to provide a response. What is your advise in this case, please?

A. This is a frequent question that we receive. When you left Canada, under the old Act and Regulations, you still had to comply with the residency obligation, meaning at that time that you could not be out of Canada for more than 6 months within any 12-month period. Obviously, you did not comply with this requirement. When you applied for a RRP (Returning Resident Permit) in August 2002, the new legislation was in place as of June 2002, and this type of application was no longer available- hence no response from the visa office. At this point in time, as per the visa office’s letter, you must decide whether to apply for a travel document, which will be refused and then challenge the decision in court (IAD) or, just sign the waiver and continue with your new application. Without knowing all the details of your case, I believe it will be very difficult to demonstrate in court that you complied with the residency obligations and win your case. A permanent resident application may be the better option but consult with an immigration lawyer before any decisions

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Citizenship

September 19, 2011 in Business Class, Immigration Services, Student Visas by CanimmigrateCanada  |  Comments Off

Citizenship Applications

A permanent resident may obtain Canadian citizenship after residing in Canada for 1095 days in a period of four years preceding their application. If the person obtained permanent residency from within Canada they could obtain citizenship after residing in Canada for two years if they meet all the requirements. Obtaining citizenship provides the person many benefits as well as guaranteeing that the person does not lose his/her status under any circumstance.

Citizenship Through Permanent Residency Canada

Canadian Citizenship is one the most prized opportunities in the world. Citizenship allows lawful permanent residents and applicants who have certain ties to Canada to apply to become citizens and be eligible to obtain a Canadian passport.

Citizenship through Permanent Residency favours applicants who meet the age, permanent residence; time lived in Canada, language, character and knowledge of Canada requirements. The Citizenship through Permanent Residency allows applicants the opportunity to become citizens of Canada and apply for a Canadian passport. The citizenship ceremony is the final step in becoming a Canadian citizen. During the citizenship ceremony, applicants will be asked to take an oath of citizenship and will receive their certificate of Canadian Citizenship.

Citizenship Through Permanent Residency Basic Requirements

To become a Canadian citizen through permanent residency, applicants must meet the following requirements:

  • Must be at least 18 years of age (or 14 years or older with parent);
  • Must possess Canadian permanent resident status;
  • Must meet the residency requirements for time lived in Canada;
  • Must possess a working knowledge of one of Canada’s official languages (English/French);
  • Must not pose a security threat or possess a criminal history;
  • Must undergo a knowledge test to confirm the applicant’s knowledge of some basic facts about Canada and Canadian citizenship.

Certain exemptions apply to the above requirements for applicants below 18 and above 54 years of age.

Citizenship Through Permanent Residency Entitlements

An applicant who is granted citizenship through permanent residency will be entitled to rights and freedoms including legal rights, equality rights, mobility rights, aboriginal peoples’ rights, freedom of thought, freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and the right to peaceful assembly. They will also have to obey Canada’s laws, express their opinions freely while respecting the rights and freedoms of others, help others in the community, care for and protect our heritage and environment, and eliminate discrimination and injustice. Another privilege is the right to vote and to have a say in the political leadership of Canada.

Citizenship Through Adoption Canada

Canadian Citizenship is one the most sought after in the world. Citizenship through adoption allows applicants who have Canadian parents to apply to obtain citizenship, receive a Canadian passport, and receive all the benefits related to citizenship.

Citizenship through adoption category favours applicants who were adopted by Canadian parents outside of Canada. Applying for adoption through citizenship allows applicants to apply for citizenship and claim their entitlements to the benefits which accrue through citizenship.

Citizenship Through Adoption Basic Requirements

For Citizenship through adoption, applicants must have been adopted outside Canada on or after January 1, 1947, possess at least one Canadian citizen parent at the time of the adoption, demonstrate that the adoption was in the best interests (of the adopted child), the adoption created a genuine parent-child relationship between the adoptive parent(s) and the adoptee, and that the adoption complied with all laws for the country of nationality of the adoptee at the time of the adoption as well the country of residence of the Canadian parent(s). Additional visa requirements also apply.

Citizenship Through Adoption Entitlements

An applicant who is granted citizenship through adoption will be entitled to rights and freedoms including legal rights, equality rights, mobility rights, aboriginal people’s rights, freedom of thought, freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and the right to peaceful assembly. They will also have to obey Canada’s laws, express their opinions freely while respecting the rights and freedoms of others, help others in the community, care for and protect our heritage and environment, and eliminate discrimination and injustice. Another of the privileges is the right to vote, and have a say in the political leadership in Canada.

Renunciation Of Canadian Citizenship

Canadian citizens who wish to become citizens of certain countries must sometimes renounce their Canadian citizenship if the other country does not allow dual citizenships. Renunciation of citizenship allows applicants who are Canadian citizens the opportunity to renounce their Canadian citizenship, affording them the opportunity to become citizens of another country.

The Renunciation of Citizenship assists applicants who decide that they want to renounce or give up their Canadian citizenship. A formal application is required to renounce Canadian citizenship and a Renunciation Certificate is granted. Once granted, applicants will lose all the rights and privileges of Canadian citizenship, including the right to travel under a Canadian passport and the right to vote.

Renunciation Of Citizenship Basic Requirements

To be eligible to renounce their Canadian citizenship, applicants must:

  • Be a Canadian citizen;
  • Prove that they are or will become a citizen of a country other than Canada if the application to renounce is approved;
  • Reside outside Canada;
  • Be at least 18 years old;
  • Not pose a threat to Canada ‘s security; and
  • Understand the significance of renouncing Canadian citizenship.

Renunciation Of Citizenship Entitlements

An applicant who is granted renunciation of citizenship will lose all the rights and privileges of Canadian citizenship and enable them to apply for citizenship of another country which prohibits dual citizenship with Canada. They will lose the right to travel under a Canadian passport, will have lost the right to vote, and if they return to Canada as a permanent resident, they will have to go through the immigration process all over again.

 

For person who has difficulty in the new citizenship test, we do provide citizenship preparation service. Please contact us for detail.

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Work Permit for Students

September 2, 2011 in Business Class, Immigration Services, Student Visas by CanimmigrateCanada  |  Comments Off

Studying in Canada: Work permits for students

It is possible to work in Canada while you are here as a student, and there are opportunities for jobs on and off campus. You will need to apply.

Learn about:

  • Working on campus
    This page provides information about applying to work at the school where you study.
  • Working off campus
    Find information about applying to work off campus while you study in Canada.
  • Co-op and internship programs
    Information is provided about applying to work as part of your academic program.
  • Working after graduation
    Information about applying to work after you graduate from school can be found on this page.
  • Work available to your spouse or common-law partner
    Find information about how your spouse or common-law partner can apply to work while you study or work in Canada.
  • Frequently asked questions
    Answers are provided to questions Citizenship and Immigration Canada is often asked about applying to work while studying in Canada.

You may need a study permit to go to school in Canada. For more information, see Study permits in the Related Links section at the bottom of this page.

 

Refugee Visa

September 2, 2011 in Business Class, Immigration Services, Student Visas by CanimmigrateCanada  |  Comments Off

Refugees

Refugees and people needing protection are people in or outside Canada who fear returning to their home country. In keeping with its humanitarian tradition and international obligations, Canada provides protection to thousands of people every year.

Canada offers refugee protection to people in Canada who fear persecution or whose removal from Canada would subject them to a danger of torture, a risk to their life or a risk of cruel and unusual treatment or punishment.

Groups and individuals can sponsor refugees from abroad who qualify to come to Canada.

Learn about:

  • Refugee claims in Canada
  • Resettlement from outside Canada
  • Sponsoring refugees
  • What Canada is doing to help refugees

 

Temporary Work visa

September 2, 2011 in Business Class, Immigration Services, Student Visas by CanimmigrateCanada  |  Comments Off

Working temporarily in Canada

Information for Haitian nationals currently in Canada temporarily who want to apply for a work permit.

Every year, over 150,000 foreign workers enter Canada to work temporarily in jobs that help Canadian employers address skill shortages, or to work as live-in caregivers.

A work permit is needed for most temporary jobs in Canada. Some jobs do not require a work permit.

If you intend to work in the province of Quebec, you must obtain a certificat d’acceptation du Québec (CAQ)before a work permit can be issued.

Notice: Don’t be a victim of fraud — Find out more.

Information for workers :

  • Who can apply for a work permit
  • How to apply
  • After applying
  • Arriving
  • Extending your stay
  • Working in Quebec
  • Jobs that do not require a work permit
  • Frequently asked questions
  • Temporary foreign workers — Your rights and the law

Certain categories of workers have their own requirements. See:

  • Information technology workers
  • Live-in caregivers
  • Business people

Information for employers

  • Hire a foreign worker

 

Visit Visa

September 2, 2011 in Business Class, Immigration Services, Student Visas by CanimmigrateCanada  |  Comments Off

Tourist Visa Canada

Canada has much to offer visitors. It borders on three oceans, has towering mountains, countless lakes and a friendly cosmopolitan culture. Under the Tourist Visitor visa, foreigners can apply to come and visit Canada for a short duration of time. This visa allows applicants to apply to come and visit Canada along with their dependent children. Applicants must intend to come to Canada to visit and refrain from engaging in work or study and respect the terms of their entry to Canada. Join more than 5 million people who visit Canada each year and explore the many touristic opportunities this great country has to offer.

Although this visa does not entitle applicants to work in Canada, it does offer them the chance to experience Canada’s diverse geographic and cultural landscape for themselves.

Tourist Visa Basic Requirements

In order to apply for the Tourist Visitor visa, applicants from designated countries are required to obtain Temporary Resident visa (TRV) prior to their arrival to Canada.

Currently, nationals from the following designated countries do not require a Tourist visa to visit Canada:

Passport holders of these countries do not need a visa to visit Canada:

 
Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium, Botswana, Brunei, Croatia, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel (National Passport holders only), Italy, Japan, Korea (Republic of), Latvia (Republic of), Lithuania, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Papua New Guinea, Poland, Portugal, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, San Marino, Singapore, Slovakia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Swaziland, Sweden, Slovenia, Switzerland, Taiwan, United Kingdom, United States, and Western Samoa.

Other conditions for eligibility also apply. All visitors must possess a valid passport, have sufficient funds for the duration of their intend stay, respect the terms of their entry to Canada, and ensure that they are criminally and medically admissible to enter Canada. Some visitors may be required to undergo a medical examination. Finally, having a letter of invitation from a Canadian friend or relative can be useful.

Tourist Visa Entitlements

As a visitor, tourists are free to travel anywhere throughout Canada and visit family, friends and experience Canada’s many attractions. They may also register for short courses relating to courses of areas of general interest, self-improvement or to register to learn English or French. During their stay, visitors can meet with prospective employers or recruiters and seek out exciting employment opportunities, explore world-class schools and educational institutions to pursue further studies, and investigate options for extending their stay in Canada.

Visitors can also take advantage of the many world-renowned festivals, cultural and artistic events which take place throughout the year, as well as explore the majestic landscapes and many natural wonders which find a home in Canada, making it truly unique.

Tourist Visa Processing Time and Costs

Government Fees and Processing Times
Application Fee C$75 – C$150
Partner Application Fee C$75 – C$150
Dependents Application Fee C$75 – C$150
Processing Time 1 to 49 Days

Business Visitor Visa Canada

Canada has much to offer business visitors. Every year, thousands of international business people flock to Canada temporarily in search of new and exciting business opportunities, for investment purposes or to advance existing business interests and relationships. Under the Business Visitor visa, foreigners can apply to come and visit Canada to do business with world-class Canadian companies.

Under the Business Visitor visa, foreigners can apply to come and visit Canada for a short time. It allows eligible applicants to explore dynamic business opportunities, participate in trade conferences, meet with Canadian counter-parts in Canada as well as experience Canadian culture and hospitality. If applicants wish to come to Canada to travel, sight-see, enjoy leisure activities and explore business options, the Business Visitor visa is best suited for them. Although this visa does not entitle applicants to work in Canada, it does offer them the chance to experience Canada for themselves.

Business Visitor Visa Basic Requirements

In order to apply for the Business Visitor visa, applicants from designated countries require a Temporary Resident visa (TRV) prior to their arrival to Canada. In addition, all applicants must possess a valid passport, respect the terms of their entry to Canada, and ensure that they are criminally and medically admissible to enter Canada.

Business Visitors must also be prepared to document their intended business activities in Canada. Their main place of business and source of income must remain outside of Canada with all profits generally accruing outside Canada.

Business Visitor Visa Entitlements

Business Visitors are free to travel anywhere throughout Canada and visit family, friends and experience Canada’s many attractions. During their stay, business visitors can take part in conferences, trade shows, meet with prospective clients, take orders, seek out lucrative business opportunities and explore their options for extending their stay in Canada. In addition, they can meet with prospective employers or recruiters and seek out employment opportunities, explore schools and educational institutions to pursue further studies and explore options for extending their stay in Canada.

Business Visitor Visa Processing Time and Costs

 

Government Fees and Processing Times
Application Fee C$75 – C$150
Partner Application Fee C$75 – C$150
Dependents Application Fee C$75 – C$150
Processing Time 1 to 49 Days


Learning English and Frenc

September 2, 2011 in Business Class, Immigration Services, Student Visas by CanimmigrateCanada  |  Comments Off

Learning English or French is essential

Speaking either English or French can help you to adapt to life in Canada by making it easier to get a job, communicate with Canadians and talk with your children in the language they learn at school.

You also need to know English or French to become a Canadian citizen. It is a good idea to learn both languages. Depending on where you decide to live in Canada, being bilingual can make it easier for you to communicate with people in your new community and at your new job.

English and French across Canada

English is the most common language spoken everywhere in Canada except the province of Quebec, where French is the official language. French is also spoken in many communities in other provinces, especially New Brunswick, Ontario and Manitoba. New Brunswick is Canada’s only officially bilingual province.

Canada is officially a bilingual country and there are anglophone and francophone communities in every province and territory.

Language training is widely available

There are many language courses available and many of them are free. Sometimes these courses are called ESL for English as a second language, or FSL, for French as a second language.

It is important to have your language skills assessed before you move to Canada. A completed language assessment will determine how much, if any, language training you need.

 

Immigration Outside Quebec

September 2, 2011 in Business Class, Immigration Services, Student Visas by CanimmigrateCanada  |  Comments Off

Francophone immigration outside Quebec

Are you Francophone?

Consider coming to a Canadian Francophone community outside Quebec.

You can visit, study, work temporarily or settle permanently in one of these communities.

Canada has two official languages: English and French.

Most French-speaking Canadians live in Quebec; however, over 1,000,000 Francophones live outside Quebec, in nine provinces and three territories.

Build your Future

Canada seeks to attract more French speakers to help Francophone minority communities prosper. You are considered a French speaker if:

  • your mother tongue is French; or
  • your mother tongue is neither French nor English, but French is the official language in which you feel more at ease.

The size of francophone communities in cities and towns outside Quebec varies. All provinces and territories in Canada have a francophone population.

The working language in these communities is usually English.

Education and health care services are run by the provinces and territories. Their availability in French depends on the region.

Find out more about Francophone communities in Canada:

  • Réseau de développement économique et d’employabilité (RDÉE)
  • Profiles of francophone communities outside Quebec
  • Provincial and territorial websites for French services — links to each province and territory’s official immigration and French services site
  • Provincial and territorial Francophone organizations — contact information and websites of francophone organizations, by province
  • Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne du Canada — main organization that speaks for Canadian francophone minority communities at the national and international levels
  • Official language organizations
  • Canadian offices abroad — find the Canadian embassy in your country
  • Official languages of Canada — more Government of Canada information
  • Video: Découvrir un chez-soi (in French only) – information for francophone immigrants regarding the services offered to assist with economic, social and cultural integration in Ontario.
  • Focus Magazine – Focus on francophone immigrant communities in Ontario (Content available in French only)

 

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